150 Years Ago: Huddersfield Chronicle (08/Jul/1865)

A selection of articles and news from the Huddersfield Chronicle from 150 years ago today.

You can download the whole issue as a PDF file (16.4MB).


Adverts

1865.07.08 advert 1

1865.07.08 advert 2

Poetry, Original and Selected

EVENING ON THE RIVER.

Over the water, over the water,
  Floating adown by the light of the moon ;
Fair Minnie Collins, the old miller’s daughter,
  Sitting beyond me, this evening in June.

Down went the sun in a heaven of splendour,
  Leaving the twilight still warm from his blaze :
Up came the rounded moon, tranquil and tender,
  Sheeting in silver the flood with her rays.

White water-lilies are languidly floating,
  Opening their bells amid broad leaves of green,
Bending their heads to the swell of our boating,
  As gardens aquatic we wander between.

Off from the meadows that border the river
  Comes the fresh odour of newly mown-hay.
Perfume from orchard and garden, while ever
  The bittern booms loud in the marsh far away.

I with the paddles, and she at the tiller,
  A vision I see, as we dreamily glide.
Of the long-vanished past, and the child of the miller
  Reams through the greenwood a child by my side.

Long vanished past! yet unchanged is the wild wood,
  The river flows by the same meadows and mill—
But ah, Minnie dear, we have both passed our childhood.
  The man and the maiden are drifting on still.

“Tis pleasant to float down the stream, my sweet neighbour,
  Through flowers and odours still shaping our way ;
While working up stream is a bore and a labour—
  The course of an hour we retrace in a day.

“But there’s no beating back up the stream of existence
  Onward and downward we speed evermore ;
Long or short be the voyage, in vain our resistance,
  We must sink in the ocean or strand on the shore.”

“If so it must be,” was the maiden’s replying—
  The laugh on her lip mocked the tear in her eye,
“Let us never look back on the shores that we’re flying
  But watch every change of the water and sky.”

“Then so let it be, my sweet moralist, ever ;
  In the same little shallop let both of us glide,
My arm at the oar as we go down the river,
  Your hand at the tiller to steer through the tide.”

Over the water, over the water,
  Boating adown by the light of the moon,
Wooed I and won I the old miller’s daughter,
  fair Minnie Collins, that evening in June.

Selections of Wit and Humour

When is a cat like a tea-pot? When you’re teasin it (tea’s in it).

Foreign Miscellany and Gossip

Linback, the Swedish pastor, who murdered several of his parishioners by poisoning the cup in which he administered the communion to them, has been sentenced to be beheaded.

Wanted

1865.07.08 advert 3

Public Notices

1865.07.08 advert 4

Magistrates in Petty Sessions

A RUNAWAY HUSBAND BURNT IN EFFIGY. Henry Iredale, a pensioner, was charged with neglecting to support his wife. Mr. Learoyd defended. It appeared that the complainant, who is in a delicate state of health, applied to Mr. Sykes, relieving officer, for relief on Monday ; and he had learned that she had no home. The defendant was now cohabiting with a woman at Marsh ; and the couple had been burnt in effigy by the inhabitants of that Place. George Iredale, brother of the defendant, was called as a witness by Mr. Sykes. Iredale stated that his brother had been married to the woman, on whose behalf the complaint had been made, 14 years. After their marriage, they went to Ireland, whence the defendant proceeded to the Crimea as a soldier, and his wife returned to her parents. About five weeks ago she came from Wiltshire in search of him. She found him, but he would not receive her; and the neighbours brought her to his (witness’s) house at Rashcliffe, where she had since been staying. Cross-examined: Defendant told him he had offered her money to see her home. Was not aware that he had illtreated her. Defendant had been in the army 23 years ; and was in receipt of a pension. Mr. Learoyd, who submitted that there was no case, said he should be able to prove the woman left the defendant of her own accord. Mr. Laycock : If the Marsh people have burnt the man in effigy, will no one come to give evidence ? The Chairman said the case would be adjourned for a week, as they could not decide upon heresay evidence. The case was accordingly adjourned for a week.

CHARGE AGAINST A “PROFESSIONAL” PEDESTRIAN. Patrick Stapleton, a celebrated pedestrian, was summoned (but did not appear) under the following circumstances :— It appears that, on Thursday week, the defendant was training, between Honley and Smithy Place, for a 1,000 yards handicap, which was to come off at Leeds on the ensuing Saturday. Mr. John Goody, of South Crosland, preferred the charge, and stated that as he was driving a gig between Honley and Smithy Place, he saw the defendant who was almost stripped, and who appeared to be training for a race. Witness had a lady in the gig, or he should have stopped the defendant, and very likely thrashed him. The Chairman reminded Mr. Goody that that would have been an indiscreet act. Mr. Goody : I was very much annoyed ; he was in such a disgraceful state. Police Constable Yates stopped the man, who acknowledged that he was training for a race. The Bench inflicted a fine of 5s. and costs ; in all 18s. 6d. ; and the Chairman intimated that, if the offence was repeated, a much heavier fine would be imposed.

LYNCH LAW AT GOLCAR. Eliza Haigh was charged with assaulting Joyes Haigh at Golcar. It appeared that on Tuesday defendant went to the house of the complainant, and pushed her against a washing machine. Complainant, who was making a pudding, had in her hand a rolling pin, and with this she “broke” the head of the defendant, who then called her all sorts of names. Mr. Laycock : You have taken the law into your own hands. The Chairman thought the complainant had acted improperly, and the case was discharged.

TRESPASS BY PIGS. Joseph Dawson, Longwood, was summoned for committing damage to a field of James Mayhall by suffering pigs to be therein. Defendant admitted that the pigs were in ; and a fine of 1s. 6d. damage, and costs were imposed ; and the defendant was advised to keep his pigs at home in future.

OBSCENE LANGUAGE. Michael Mahon, an old offender, was fined 1s. and costs 10s., or ten days to prison, for using disgusting epithets to Catherine Gannon on Monday last.

Snakes and Monkeys!

1870 was a good year for stories about escaped exotic animals!

In May, the Huddersfield Chronicle took great delight in reporting the police’s attempts to capture a snake in the town centre:1

Capture of a Runaway Snake.

On Sunday morning two boys called at the Borough Police Station, and informed Inspector Townend that they had seen a snake crawling down Cross Queen Street — a narrow thoroughfare at the rear of the Gymnasium Hall and the Theatre Royal, and extending, from Bull and Mouth Street, near the Police Station, to Queen Street. Inspector Townend, upon the “information received,” sallied from the office, and, near the Fire Brigade Station, in the narrow street alluded to already, espied the reptile, which would be about one yard long. The Inspector, not knowing whether it was of a venemous or docile order, felt somewhat perplexed, and contemplated the “apprehension” of the monster with bated breath. While the Inspector occupied himself with devising means for the successful capture of the stranger, who was now in jeopardy of being “brought up” under the Vagrant Act, for “wandering abroad without any visible means of subsistence, and not giving a good account of himself,” the snake kept crawling onwards, to the evident amusement and gratification of the bystanders, and the Inspector was loathe to lay hands upon it, or take it into his custody. Mr. C.P. Hobkirk, however, happened to be passing, and went to the assistance of the Inspector, who, with unusual willingness, resigned his charge into other hands. Mr. Hobkirk took possession of the snake, and preserved it in the ordinary way. On Tuesday morning Mr. Withers, head constable, received a note from Mr. W.E. Thomas, stating that, in autumn last, a snake escaped from its box at the Naturalist Society’s exhibition, held in the Gymnasium Hall, and it was never found. If the snake captured on Sunday morning is that which escaped in autumn, it would be difficult to trace the ground over which, with its slow locomotion it has traversed ; and naturalists will be curious to know the kind of food upon which it has subsisted in the meantime.

In October, the Chronicle reported on an escaped monkey in Dungeon Wood, Lockwood:2

Escape and Capture of a Monkey.

On Wednesday morning, as a gentleman from Lockwood was enjoying a stroll through Dungeon Wood, he was somewhat startled by a strange sound and rustling of the bushes. A retriever dog, with which he was accompanied, soon unearthed the cause of the alarm, which proved to be an untamed monkey. Perceiving its enemy (the dog), the monkey began to chatter most energetically, at the same time bounding and climbing from one wall to another, and anon secreting itself among the brushwood. The canine tormentor did not allow it to remain long in its hiding place, and, had it not been for the timely interference of the gentleman, no doubt the monkey would have been severely treated by its pursuer. At length the monkey was captured, and claimed by Mr. Davis, lithographer, whose brother, a seaman, had recently brought it from abroad. The monkey had for the night been fastened under the cellar steps, but had contrived to escape.

illustration from "Hunting and Trapping Stories: A Book for Boys" (1903)
illustration from “Hunting and Trapping Stories: A Book for Boys” (1903)

Large Mushrooms and Walking Blindfold to Castle Hill

One of the joys of hunting through old editions of local newspapers is stumbling across weird and wonderful articles.

Let it never be said nothing exciting ever happens in Kirkburton:1

Large Mushroom.

The other day a large mushroom was gathered in a field near to the Stocksmoor Station. It measured ten inches across, and was healthy in appearance.

Meanwhile, over in Armitage Bridge and Berry Brow:2

Extraordinary Feat.

A large number of persons assembled in the Big Valley, Armitage Bridge, on Saturday afternoon, to witness an extraordinary feat performed by Mr. Joshua Longbottom, joiner, Berry Brow. This person had undertaken, for a wager of 50 shillings to walk blindfolded from that place to the top of Castle Hill under 30 minutes. Sponges were placed over his eyes, and tied on by a bandage, and over this was a bag or cap securely fastened. The start took place near the Coalpit Lane, Longbottom having no other assistance than two small sticks in his hands. Off he started in good style, but the small sticks were taken from him, not being considered as coming within the conditions of the race. To supply the place of these he used his two-foot rule, but that aid was also taken away from him. Nothing daunted away he went, and, with no other assistance than his hands and feet, he accomplished the difficult task by reaching the pole (erected by the Sappers and Miners on the crown of the hill some years ago) in the extraordinary short space of 23½ minutes.

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Huddersfield Chronicle (07/Jan/1871) – Golcar: Lost in a Fog

GOLCAR.

Lost in a Fog.

On Tuesday night a flock-dealer, from Ley Moor, Golcar, found himself in a ludicrous position, and which has caused considerable amusement to numbers of his friends and neighbours. It seems he visited Huddersfield that day on business, and bad imbibed to an extent that towards night he became somewhat muddled. Remaining in town till the last train had left Huddersfield, he started off to walk home, and managed very well till Chapel Hill was reached ; but here the fog (in his head) was so thick that, instead of continuing on Manchester Road, he took the more easy one, and descended Chapel Hill, continuing on through Lockwood and Dungeon, nor did he discover his mistake until rudely brought to his recollection during the small hours of the morning, by discovering that instead of being, as he imagined, at Golcar, he was actually in the Big Valley, and going to Netherton. Chagrined, he retraced his steps, and ultimately reached home, the fog having by that time become much less dense than when he left Huddersfield.

Huddersfield Chronicle (08/Oct/1870) – Lockwood: Escape and Capture of a Monkey

LOCKWOOD.

Escape and Capture of a Monkey.

On Wednesday morning, as a gentleman from Lockwood was enjoying a stroll through Dungeon Wood, he was somewhat startled by a strange sound and rustling of the bushes. A retriever dog, with which he was accompanied, soon unearthed the cause of the alarm, which proved to be an untamed monkey. Perceiving its enemy (the dog), the monkey began to chatter most energetically, at the same time bounding and climbing from one wall to another, and anon secreting itself among the brushwood. The canine tormentor did not allow it to remain long in its hiding place, and, had it not been for the timely interference of the gentleman, no doubt the monkey would have been severely treated by its pursuer. At length the monkey was captured, and claimed by Mr. Davis, lithographer, whose brother, a seaman, had recently brought it from abroad. The monkey had for the night been fastened under the cellar steps, but had contrived to escape.

Huddersfield Chronicle (14/Sep/1850) – Having an Outing

An amusing write up of two men getting wasted in Holmfirth and then crashing their horse drawn carriage (“phæton“) near Berry Brow.

I’m intrigued about the use of “totally fu” in the article — is this an abbreviated version of “totally f**ked”?!


BERRY BROW

HAVING AN OUTING

The other day, two gentlemen from Huddersfield took a phæton for a day’s outing, and went to Holmfirth. What occurred at that town is not our intention to relate, suffice it that they were “rather fu,” when the commenced their journey homewards, and what with their additional potations and the effects of the night air, they became perfectly “glorious.” Somewhere near eleven o’clock at night (for ought they seem to know it might have been broad non), just a little below Berry Brow, these unfortunate Jehus could get no further, and topsy-turvey they went on to the foot road. Shortly afterwards Mr. Superintendent Heaton came up, and found them sprawling on the ground — the phæton shaft broken, and one of the travellers groping in blissful ignorance for his chapo. In answer to Mr. Heaton’s interrogations, they expressed themselves as “exceedingly glad that somebody had come up whom they knew;” and one of them added, “I told — you Bill — you would throw — us — over; but you would — drive — you know.” Ultimately the unfortunate mortals were relieved from the dilemma, and we hope their night’s experience will have taught them a beneficial lesson.


wasted